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Entries from March 31st, 2011

Fathers and Daughters – “China: Its History and Culture” – Morton, W. Scott

March 31st, 2011 · Comments Off on Fathers and Daughters – “China: Its History and Culture” – Morton, W. Scott · China, Culture, Poetry

Two poems of Bo Juyi on the death after two days’ illness of Golden Bells, his only child, a girl of three, perhaps two by Western reckoning: Girls are a burden, but if one has no son It is strange how fond one can grow, even of a girl! … The clothes she was wearing […]

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Buddhism – “China: Its History and Culture” – Morton, W. Scott

March 31st, 2011 · Comments Off on Buddhism – “China: Its History and Culture” – Morton, W. Scott · China, Religion

The historic Buddha, known as Sakyamuni, founder of the religion about 500 B.C., was a prince of Magadha in modern Nepal in the Himalayan foothills. The tradition of Buddhism was at first purely oral, and it is not easy to distinguish early fact from later accretions in the establishment of his beliefs and teaching. Certain of […]

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Confucism and the Working Class – “China: Its History and Culture” – Morton, W. Scott

March 31st, 2011 · Comments Off on Confucism and the Working Class – “China: Its History and Culture” – Morton, W. Scott · China, Morality, Philosophy

In practice (Confucism) was confined to an ethical handbook for the scholar official and had little message and no solace for the common peasant or small merchant, whom it counseled to behave well and keep to his subordinate position.

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The Romance of the Three Kingdoms – “China: Its History and Culture” – Morton, W. Scott

March 30th, 2011 · Comments Off on The Romance of the Three Kingdoms – “China: Its History and Culture” – Morton, W. Scott · China, Culture, Ethnicity, War

“Just as Shakespeare drew upon a fund of battle tales from the Wars of the Roses and the Japanese No plays dwelt upon the heroism of the Gempei Wars, so the Chinese authors of later drama and of the famous novel, The Romance of the Three Kingdoms, found a rich mine of themes in this […]

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Liu Bang! – “China: Its History and Culture” – Morton, W. Scott

March 30th, 2011 · Comments Off on Liu Bang! – “China: Its History and Culture” – Morton, W. Scott · China, History

At the same time aristocratic opposition, which had never been entirely stifled, revived in a reconstituted Chu kingdom under Xiang Yu. His lieutenant, Liu Bang, succeeded in defeating the third and last Qin emperor in the valley of the Wei in 206 B.C. and then turned against his master, Xiang Yu, and defeated him. Liu Bang […]

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Confucius – “China: Its History and Culture” – Morton, W. Scott

March 29th, 2011 · Comments Off on Confucius – “China: Its History and Culture” – Morton, W. Scott · China, Philosophy, Religion

Kong Fu Zi (Master Kong) (551-479 B.C.), or Confucius, in the latinized form of his name used by the Jesuits in the seventeenth century, was born and raised in the state of Lu in Shandong province in northeast China. The materials on his life are meager, after a due purge of all the laudatory and imaginary […]

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On the Words of No One – “The Man Who Loved China” – Simon Winchester

March 29th, 2011 · Comments Off on On the Words of No One – “The Man Who Loved China” – Simon Winchester · China, Quotes, Science

The Royal Society’s motto Nullius in verbia, “On the words of no one”

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UNESCO’s Mission Statement – “The Man Who Loved China” – Simon Winchester

March 28th, 2011 · Comments Off on UNESCO’s Mission Statement – “The Man Who Loved China” – Simon Winchester · China, Quotes, War

UNESCO’s stated aims—though he found the preamble to its constitution, “Since wars begin in the minds of men, it is in the minds of men that the defences of peace must be constructed”

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Rewi Alley – “The Man Who Loved China” – Simon Winchester

March 27th, 2011 · Comments Off on Rewi Alley – “The Man Who Loved China” – Simon Winchester · China, History, War

Rewi Alley was often compared to Lawrence of Arabia—Edgar Snow, for one, wrote that “where Lawrence brought to the Arabs the destructive technique of guerrilla war, Alley was to bring the constructive technique of guerrilla industry…. It may yet rank as one of the great human adventures of our time.”

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“The Man Who Loved China” – Simon Winchester

March 27th, 2011 · Comments Off on “The Man Who Loved China” – Simon Winchester · China, History, Uncategorized

An organization known as Indusco, or the Chinese Industrial Cooperative (CIC), was formally set up. By happenstance the first two characters of this new organization’s Chinese name were gung ho—and though there was no linguistic connection, the two words were very soon afterward adopted as a motto by a friend of Alley’s in the U.S. […]

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